If you go to Israel, you’ll be shown all kinds of sites where Jesus allegedly walked.

The site where his mother is said to have seen the angel Gabriel.

The site where he is said to have been born.

The site where he’s said to have been baptized.

Two sites where he’s said to have fed the 5,000.

Two sites where he was arrested.

The site where he was tried.

And executed.

A couple of sites where he was buried.

Many of these have churches to mark the “exact location.”

There’s a church on the site where he’s said to have ascended to heaven, complete with a footprint he is said to have left in the rock.

After a while, you start wondering what’s real. Because it’s not likely that people were following Jesus around, pounding signposts into the ground to mark the spot.

Is there any place we can know for sure Jesus stood?

We know that Jesus lived in Galilee and went to the synagogue every Shabbat. So if we could find an authentic first-century synagogue in Galilee, it would be a good bet Jesus was there.

What About the Synagogue at Capernaum?

Jesus had his headquarters in Capernaum, a village near the north end of the Sea of Galilee.

My wife and I worked on an archaeological dig in Jerusalem for a couple of weeks this summer. When that was done, we went up to Galilee for a few days. We stopped by Capernaum, one of our favorite spots in Galilee.

There’s a beautiful synagogue at Capernaum that most tourists visit. Here’s a picture I took:

The synagogue at Capernaum

It’s big and beautiful. Did Jesus stand here?

Unfortunately, this synagogue was probably built in the fourth century. So Jesus never set foot in this building. The synagogue was built on the site of an earlier synagogue, and Jesus certainly taught in that one. But not in the one shown in the photo.

The problem is that there just aren’t that many synagogues in Israel that date to the first century. Until recently, only six were known.

But in 2009, a new one was discovered in Magdala, the hometown of Mary Magdalene. A Catholic organization wanted to build a retreat center there on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. As soon as they broke ground for the new building, they began making sensational finds, including a synagogue. They called in the authorities and launched an archaeological dig.

They found a coin dating to the year AD 29, which proved that this synagogue dates to the first century.

Did Jesus Visit the Synagogue at Magdala?

The obvious question to ask is whether Jesus ever visited this synagogue at Magdala.

And the answer seems very clear to me. Yes, he did.

Magdala is only about six miles from Capernaum. There was a road running south along the Sea of Galilee, connecting Capernaum to Magdala. You could walk between the two towns in a couple of hours.

It’s true that none of the four gospels ever mention Jesus visiting Magdala.

But that’s not surprising. The four gospels mention by name only a very few towns or villages that Jesus visited in Galilee. Nazareth. Cana. Capernaum. Chorazin. Nain. That’s most of them.

But there were more than 200 villages in Galilee, and the gospels say that Jesus walked all through Galilee.

It’s likely that he visited every single village and town in Galilee. To see how that was possible, see my blog post On The Road With Jesus.

And Magdala was one of the larger towns, probably ranking in the top five.

So yes, Jesus visited Magdala. His close friend, Mary Magdalene lived there. She was likely a wealthy woman, because the gospels say she helped support Jesus and his friends.

And the gospels are also clear that Jesus was a rabbi, a Torah teacher.

Without a doubt, he’d have been asked to speak in any synagogue he chose to visit on Shabbat.

The Strange Magdala Stone

But we can say more. The archaeologists found a strange stone in the synagogue at Magdala. Nothing like it has been found anywhere in Israel.

The stone is inscribed with beautiful artwork on all four sides and also on top.

The art shows a menorah and what appears to be symbols representing the Temple in Jerusalem.

These may well be the earliest images of the Temple that we have.

The stone may have been used to hold the Torah scroll during the reading on Shabbat.

If so, then Jesus would have stood in front of it when teaching in the synagogue.

Even if it wasn’t used to hold the Torah scroll, Jesus must have admired the art on it when he visited. It’s just too beautiful to ignore.

My wife and I worked on the Magdala dig for about a week back in 2015. We went back to visit this summer to see what progress they’ve made on the site.

Here is a picture I took of the synagogue at Magdala. Near the center, there’s a replica of the Magdala stone showing where it was found:

The synagogue at Magdala

Here are some pictures I took of the on-site replica of the Magdala stone. In the first, you can see the menorah. The second appears to show a representation of the Temple in Jerusalem.

The menorah on the Magdala stone

One side of the Magdala stone

If You Get a Chance to Visit Magdala, Do It!

If you visit Israel on a tour, the odds are high that your guide will take you to Capernaum. This has been a traditional tourist stop for years. Many tours now also include Magdala, because it’s close to Capernaum and just as exciting.

I personally like Magdala more, because you can get closer to the archaeological finds. And because you can see a synagogue where you know with high confidence that Jesus actually visited.

Work is ongoing at Magdala, and I expect they’ll continue to uncover more of the past over the next few years.

You can read all about the archaeological park at Magdala here.

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